Your Network, Your Community, Your Mix

Why Cara Delevingne and Ruby Rose Talking About Mental Health Is Needed

The face of depression isn’t just a person who cries all the time. They can be cheery and chatty and confident.
5.78K 2

A few days ago Cara Delevingne took to Twitter to explain how dealing with mental illness made being a supermodel pretty tough.

I suffer from depression and was a model during a particularly rough patch of self hatred.

I am so lucky for the work I get to do but I used to work to try and escape and just ended up completely exhausting myself.

I am focusing on filming and trying to learn how to not pick apart my every flaw. I am really good at that.

Okay…. Rant over. Just wanted to clarify and word vomit a little.”

Days later, Ruby Rose also posted about her own struggle.

As someone who suffers with anxiety, panic attacks, and periods of depression, I think Cara and Ruby sharing these things is a very, very good thing.

Yes, I get why some people don’t like it. There are people who think that someone who’s famous has no right to discuss such a big, serious topic.

And we don’t necessarily want famous faces being to be the definitive face people think of when they hear about mental illness.

I get all that.

But I’m of the opinion that celebrities sharing their struggles also does a lot of good.

When they admit that they’ve experienced issues with mental health, it does a number of important things.

One: It gets us talking about mental health in a big way.

Two: It breaks down the silence and stigma surrounding mental illness – because if we can talk about Cara Delevingne having depression, maybe it’s okay for us to talk about what we’re going through, too.

Also, when a celebrity speaks out, it reminds everyone that people who seem to have everything can be pretty miserable.

Depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, eating disorders – they’re not moralistic beings that judge how sad you should be, based on your current wage and living situation.

You can have everything you could possibly need in life and not be happy. It’s not a choice. It’s not being ungrateful, or moaning, or not realising that other people ‘have it much worse’.

It’s your brain malfunctioning. It can happen to you even if you ‘should’ be the happiest person around.

The face of depression isn’t just a person who cries all the time. They can be cheery and chatty and confident.

Mental illness is an invisible illness.

You can’t tell what someone’s going through just by looking at them.

When a celebrity admits they have a mental illness, it works to add another story and face to what we think of when we think of mental health and helps break down the negative stereotypes of what people with mental illness are like.

And for people going through similar stuff, a celebrity being open about their issues makes us feel less alone – and reminds us that we can get through this.

If someone with depression can battle through it, work hard, and be mega successful, we can, too.

Subscribe to KitschMix's newsletter for more stories you don't want to miss.

Since you’re here …

Like many other media organisations, KitschMix is operating in an incredibly challenging financial climate. More people are reading the KitschMix than ever, but our advertising revenues are falling fast. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. KitschMix is an independent website that takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce, but we do it because we believe women in the LGBTQ community need more positive visibility.

If everyone who reads our articles, who likes them, helps to support them, our future would be much more secure.

Make a contribution

FROM OUR PARTNERS

Author
Suzie Carter is the Senior Women's Writer at KitschMix. Listed among her achievements are performing stand-up, graduating from London Met and writing for her favourite publications. She enjoys covering women’s topics, watching celebrities self-destruct and rising to any occasion.

2 Comments

  • B. says:

    I have mental health issues. Lots of people do and we get discriminated against at work and bullied for it by managers as well as for being lgbt+. People think we are doing stuff wrong but they don’t know that we are disabled. If you tell them it can backfire also due to prejudice. HR always back up management. It can be hard to get the right treatment too.

  • […] this month, Cara Delevingne revealed that she was suffering from depression while she was modelling, and needed to take a break for a while, and now she’s outlined why she posted the series of […]

Leave a Reply

sign-up-insert-01