Tag Archives: Brazil

Marielle Franco’s widow elected to Rio city council

The widow of a bisexual Rio de Janeiro councilwoman who was murdered in 2018 was elected to the city’s council on Sunday.

Brazilian media reports indicate Mônica Benício ran for the Rio City Council as a member of the leftist Socialism and Liberty Party.

Benício finished 11th among the candidates who ran with 22,999 votes. She noted her support of LGBTQ rights ahead of Sunday’s election.

“We are elected. The City Council will have an openly lesbian councilwoman! I am very grateful to the more than 22,000 people who voted for a future feminist and anti-fascist mandate for the Rio City Council! Let’s transform this city together!”

Benício’s fiancée, Marielle Franco, a woman of African descent who identified as bisexual, was a member of the Rio City Council when she and her driver, Anderson Gomes, were murdered on March 14, 2018.

Franco was a rising political star known for defending Rio’s black, LGBT and favela communities.

Franco’s murder sparked outrage throughout Brazil and around the world. The Human Rights Campaign and Human Rights Watch are among the organisations that condemned the killing.

Brazilian authorities in March 2019 arrested two former policemen in connection with Franco’s murder.

One of the men was arrested at his home in the same condominium complex in which President Jair Bolsonaro lived when he represented Rio in Brazil’s Congress.

Bolsonaro—a former Brazilian Army captain who took office as the country’s president nearly two years ago—continues to face widespread criticism over his rhetoric against LGBTQ Brazilians, women and other underrepresented groups.

Bolsonaro last fall strongly denied Brazilian media reports that linked him to the two suspects in Franco’s murder. Bolsonaro’s sons, Flávio and Carlos Bolsonaro, who are members of the Brazilian Senate and the Rio City Council respectively, have also faced questions over their potential involvement in the killing.

Brazilian Producer Arca Makes Queer Music for the Rebellion

MicahTron makes hard rap. Hayley Kiyoko churns out sugary pop. HYM bends time and gender. Mashrou’ Leila jams to political Arabic rock. If you want any genre of queer music, you can have it. Yet even with all those categories, Arca stands out as a spectacle all his own.

The closest you could get to describing Arca is “experimental, operatic, BDSM-flavored electronica.” And even that is just a cherry-picked handful of descriptors. Other words could include folksy, rebellious, enlightening, haunting, and transcendent. Arca writes for Frank Ocean, Kanye West, FKA Twigs and Björk, but he really shines on his independent albums. His newest release is the self-titled album Arca.

When you pull the mask off, Arca is just a gay Venezuelan man named Alejandro Ghersi who hid in the closet throughout his entire childhood. When he arrived in the U.S. at 17, he picked up a random man at the train station and lost his virginity to him the next day.

That’s the type of album this is: Unapologetic. Bursting at the seams. Ready to experiment and become itself.

Ghersi kept his sexuality out of most of his music for his first two award-winning albums, but now that he has achieved international fame, he’s tired of removing himself from his art. The result is Arca, which is an anthem for not just gay men, but also lesbians, queer women, genderqueer people, and people who are unsure of their sexuality. In other words, anyone who’s always felt…different.

Paradoxically, in order to come out, Ghersi first has to go back: back to the conservative area of Venezuela where he remained closeted. From Venezuela he pulls out tonada, traditional folk music that originated in Spain but is also popular in Latin America. Over a tonada-inspired reverb, Arca’s lyrics twist back and forth between English and Spanish.

The Fader says:

Arca sings about queer sex with untreated vocals, which have a crystalline purity. The new songs sound like liturgical laments, unfurling in Spanish amid ever-shifting arrhythmic beats and tense moments of sonic sparseness. In fact, they’re inspired by a Spanish and Hispanic folk style, Tonada, as well as a few ghosts of queer folks past.

Ghersi’s album has a theme: In order to be yourself, you have to love the parts of yourself that hate you – in this case, the Venezuelan community who forced him into the closet and chastised him for not being masculine enough.

And sometimes, being yourself hurts. And vulnerability hurts. And even sex hurts. The body is fragile and the self can be shredded, and the result isn’t necessarily beautiful, but it is truth. Arca’s message rings especially true for queer people who come from families and communities who reject them.

But all the words in the world can’t capture this album’s magic. Listen to Arca for yourself.

Nicola Adams Says She’s Encountered Racism And Sexism In Boxing, But Never Homophobia

Nicola Adams became the first woman to secure an Olympic boxing title when she won gold at London 2012 and is also the reigning Olympic, World, Commonwealth Games and European champion at flyweight.

Asked by GQ magazine about whether she encounters prejudice in the sport, the British boxer (who is bisexual) said:

Racism, yes. Sexism, yes, in boxing: people saying women shouldn’t box. I’ve never come across homophobia.

The racism was more when I was younger, in primary school, and it’s about kids not understanding. I used to struggle with being called black. I said, ‘No, look at me, I’m brown’.

My mother’s side is quite mixed. She’s mixed race, my uncles and my auntie have white partners, my stepdad is white. I was always used to seeing white and black round the table. I never understood why people would be racist.”

gqnicolaadams0211a

Adams says she realised she was bisexual aged 15, and has gone on to top the list of Britain’s most influential LGBT people.

It was quite a scary thought for me at the time. You never know how the family is going to react, so I was nervous.

Mum was in the kitchen washing up and I was like, ‘I’ve got something to tell you’. I was so nervous, I was really sweating.

She said ‘What’s wrong?’ and I was just like ‘I’m bisexual’ and she said ‘OK… put the kettle on’.”

nicola-adams-british-vogue-2016-her-pink-jersey

This year in Rio Adams successfully defended her gold medal, but said her greatest regret was never meeting her hero, Muhammad Ali, who died in June.

I would loved to have met him and said, ‘You are the reason I wanted to become an Olympic champion too’.

He will always be known, he’ll always be there, the greatest who ever lived.

Nobody will ever forget him.”

Read the full interview in the December issue of GQ, on sale Monday.

Out Olympian Nicola Adams Wins Flyweight Gold Again

Out boxer, Nicola Adams has won a unanimous points decision to beat France’s Sarah Ourahmoune, and become Britain’s first gold boxing medal in Rio.

Boxing-Olympics-Day-15

Adams told the BBC.

The gold rush continues. I’m now officially the most accomplished amateur boxer Great Britain has ever had. I can’t believe it.”

Adams, from Leeds, has won Olympic, European and Commonwealth golds and now becomes the first Briton to defend her Olympic crown since middleweight Harry Mallin in 1924.

She started strongly against the 15th-ranked Ourahmoune, winning the first of four two-minute rounds on all three judges’ scorecard.

RIOEC8I1C8ILG_1536x864

She improved further in the second, again winning across the board after pinning back her opponent with speed and accuracy.

In past interviews, Adams has talked openly about her sexuality — and the fact it has never been an issue for her in her sport or personal life.

One label that has been attached to me is “bisexual”, although I would rather be just a person and not be categorised. …

I have never tried to hide my sexuality, but I have never spoken about it before in the press, either, because I didn’t want it to overshadow everything else. It is an important aspect of who I am, but it doesn’t define me.

I worried about how everyone would react, so I used to say I was single, rather than say I was with a girl. I felt like I was lying all the time. I didn’t like living like that so, in the end, I thought, ‘Well, this is who I am. It’s not as if I can stop it.”

Rio-Olympic-Games-2016-Day-Fifteen

Athletes have traditionally feared coming out, but Adams, who was named the most influential LGBT individual in Britain by The Independent in 2012, said she never tried to hide it.

The most important thing is to be honest about yourself. Secrets weigh heavy and it’s when you try to keep everything to yourself that it becomes a burden. You waste energy agonising when you could be living your life and realising your dreams.’

Adams has dominated her sport since the London Olympics in 2012, and in May secured the last major title to elude her, when she was crowned world flyweight champion.

She is once again the reigning Olympic, world, Commonwealth and European Games champion, having also won European and EU golds.

Rio 2016: The Decidedly Gay-Friendly Olympics

Unlike the Sochi Games two years ago, where gay rights were called into question over anti-gay laws enacted by Russia’s government, the Rio Games seem to be increasingly tolerant by comparison.

It hasn’t been flawless — for example, homophobic slurs were shouted by some in the stands at a U.S. women’s soccer match as the games opened — but there’s certain signs of progress on the inclusion front.

Olympic beach volleyball bronze medalist Larissa Franca of Brazil, said in a recent interview

I know all the prejudice that exists in society against homosexuals. We don’t choose our feelings, let alone control them.”

GetImage

Her comments, mirrored U.S. women’s basketball star Elena Delle Donne, who came out and announced her engagement last week.

That’s what I hope for and I feel like our society is going in the right direction. That’s not a story. It’s normal.”

So far in these Olympics, there seems to be far more cheering than prejudice.

Whether it was a transgender model appearing in the athletes’ parade at the opening ceremony, two men kissing during their leg of the torch relay along Copacabana Beach or the British women’s field hockey team including two teammates who are married — an Olympic first — it has already been a games unlike any other for the LGBTQ community.

57a14433d7483.image

That’s as the International Olympic Committee intended, too. After Sochi, the IOC required future Olympic host cities to abide by rules that forbid any kind of discrimination, including with regard to sexual orientation.

IOC spokesman Mark Adams said Tuesday.

It’s in the charter that we don’t accept any discrimination on grounds of race or religion and sexuality is now included in that.”

Outsports.com reported that there are at least 46 publicly known LGBT athletes in the Rio Games, the highest number of any Olympics.

British diver Tom Daley won a bronze medal in the synchronized competition, with his fiance in the stands to cheer him on — and whatever buzz that created didn’t seem to overshadow the medal accomplishment whatsoever.

Daley came out in 2013 and said he’s never been happier.

I’m at my most consistent. I feel ready physically, psychologically, everything, so I’m really excited.”

Daley said the support he’s gotten has been empowering, and British racewalker Tom Bosworth can relate. When Bosworth revealed his sexuality publicly last year, he said he was blown away by the support from those who already knew and people he never met.

It’s actually spurred me on. It’s actually given me more motivation. … Now I feel like I’m doing it for even more people than before.”

10 Awesome Queer Women We’ve Been Rooting For At Rio 2016

Apparently there are double the amount of out LGBT athletes competing in Rio this year compared to the 2012 London Olympics and the majority of them are gay women.

So, we have compiled a list of our top 10 favourites for you to all look out for.

Put those tongues away ladies, these gals have got medals to win.


1. Elena Delle Donne
FY16_INNO_BB_AEROSWIFT_USAB_AWAY_EDONNE_WMS_original.0.0

Elena is 26, a basketball player, and is representing the USA. She only recently came out as gay in the August issue of Vogue. What a complete babe she is and her partner, Amanda Clifton, must be very proud indeed.


2. Seimone Augustus

57a14433d7483.image

Seimone is 32 and a 2014 Basketball World Champion as well as a two-time gold medallist as well. Seimone married her wife Lataya Varner in 2015 and is sure to give her best in Rio this year. Go girl!


3. Kate and Helen Richardson-Walsh

103834959-HelenRichardson-Walsh-sport-large_trans++qVzuuqpFlyLIwiB6NTmJwfSVWeZ_vEN7c6bHu2jJnT8 helen-richardson-walsh-emily-wold_3489377

These two just have to be one of the sweetest married lez couples in sport. They both play Hockey for the UK team and married in 2013. They secured the bronze medal in London 2012 and have every chance of bringing it home together this year.


4. Larissa Franca

GetImage

Larissa is a beach volleyball player and will be representing Brazil. She married her wife, Liliane Maestrini in 2013. Larissa is the 2012 Olympic Bronze medallist and 2011 World Champion so she is sure to do well again this year.


5. Megan Rapinoe

0813_RCSP_MeganRapinoe2

Super cute Megan plays Woman’s soccer for team USA. She recently got engaged to her girlfriend, singer/songwriter Sera Cahoone. The team are the world cup champions and it would be amazing if they could take home the Olympic gold as well. Do your best Megan, we’re all right behind you!


6. Hedvig Lindahl

USA+v+Sweden+Quarterfinal+Women+Football+Olympics+DB_vGy5SIbEx

Hedvig represents Sweden in women’s soccer and she is their goalkeeper. She has a wife and a son who apparently go with her when she plays and cheer her on from the side-lines. We’re cheering you as well, Hedvig.


7. Ashley Nee

nee-heats-crop-935x500

Ashley is a little cutie and at 27 years old she represents the USA in kayaking. She is married to Ashley McEwen and they got married on the Potomac River where Ashley first learnt how to paddle. That’s just so darn super cute and gives us all a warm, fuzzy glow.


8. Katie Duncan

Katie represents New Zealand in the football team. Her wife Priscilla is also a New Zealand footballer. Before Katie left for Rio she shaved her head for charity so not only is she super sexy she’s also super kind as well.


9. Michelle Heyman

r0_200_4500_2750_w1200_h678_fmax

Michelle is a striker for Australia and this is her first Olympic Games appearance. She is 28 and also sports some of the coolest tats ever. She said in an interview once that she has always been out and proud and when she returns from Rio she is going to get some Olympic Rings tattooed on her body somewhere as a memento.


10. Nadine Muller

leichtathletikwm-na_317591a-1024x576

Nadine is a discus thrower representing Germany and has never earned an Olympic Medal so now is her chance. She married her wife on New Year’s Eve in 2013 and announced it publically on Facebook. We all hope she will be throwing her discus as far as possible with those awesome biceps of hers flexing away.

Brazilian Women’s Rugby Star Receives Marriage Proposal From Girlfriend Following Finals At Rio 2016

After the medal ceremony following the first women’s rugby sevens final in Olympic history on Monday had ended, Marjorie Enya, a manager at Deodoro Stadium, asked her girlfriend, Isadora Cerullo to marry her.

Cerullo was a member of the Brazil squad that narrowly missed out on reaching the knockout rounds rugby sevens tornement.

https://twitter.com/DanielleWarby/status/762826188226113540

Talking to the BBC, Enya said

As soon as I knew she was in the squad I thought I have to make this special. I know rugby people are amazing and they would embrace it.”

The couple had been together for two years.

She is the love of my life. The Olympic Games can look like closure but for me it’s starting a new life with someone. I wanted to show people that love wins.”

Cerullo grew up in North Carolina and holds dual citizenship of Brazil and the United States.

Though she had never lived in Brazil before, she moved with Enya to São Paulo to focus on making the women’s rugby sevens squad for the Games.

According to Outsports, there are at least 45 publicly out lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex athletes at the Rio games, as well as three coaches.

Several out athletes are also taking part in the Paralympics.

Nicola Adams: “No One Has Ever Really Cared About Me Being Bisexual”

Nicola Adams – who is heading to Rio games this summer to defend her Olympic gold medal – features in August’s Vogue.

In the interview, Adams talked openly about her sexuality — and the fact it has never been an issue for her in her sport or personal life.

Nicola-Adams-for-online-only-vogue-30june16_B

No one’s ever really cared about me being bisexual and I only came out because I had always been out, it’s just the general public didn’t know. I’m quite fearless. I’m like, let’s just go out there and do this and see what happens.”

Athletes have traditionally feared coming out, but Adams, who was named the most influential LGBT individual in Britain by The Independent in 2012, said she never tried to hide it.

Adams has dominated her sport since the London Olympics in 2012, and in May secured the last major title to elude her, when she was crowned world flyweight champion.

She will head to Rio as the reigning Olympic, world, Commonwealth and European Games champion, having also won European and EU golds.

The boxer, who was born in Leeds, said her triumphs had not come without making compromises.

The sacrifices are hard. You miss christenings, weddings, birthday parties. But then you think about what you’ll achieve.”

See the full shoot and interview with Nicola in the August issue of Vogue, on sale Thursday.

Sao Paolo Hosts The World’s Biggest Pride Parade As Hundreds Of Thousands Turn Out To March

Hundreds of thousands of marchers turned out to make history at Sao Paulo’s 20th annual Gay Pride parade on Sunday.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BF_wyLkPa3f

Participants said one goal of this year’s procession is to offer a major show of support of proposed federal legislation that would allow Brazilians to claim the gender identity of their choosing, “which may or may not correspond to their gender at birth,” the text of the bill states.

One participant said.

For some people, this is a Carnival out of season — to have fun, mess up and do some wrong things. In my case and for many others, we came for a cause — asking for respect, to fight for our rights, for people to treat the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community better. We are human beings, just like any others.”

The legislation, if approved, would also require government health providers to pay for sex-change operations.

The Pride in Sao Paulo began at 10am on Avenida Paulista, with over a thousand police officers were on hand – due to protests were planned against acting president Michel Temer, the replacement for Dilma Rousseff, who is undergoing an impeachment trial.

https://www.instagram.com/p/aGXHNDMpUc/

Sao Paulo held it first Gay Pride march in 1996 and drew a mere 2,000 people.

But now it has become a top tourist draw in this city of 20 million, second only after the Formula One car race.

One LGBT rights activist, Viviany Beleboni, 27, told reporters she would march with a Bible in hand to protest an evangelical group in parliament that has blocked pro-LGBT legislation.

A draft law to punish homophobic actions has been stalled for years by Catholic and evangelical blocs.

Brazil’s Supreme Court in 2011 recognized the stable unions of homosexual couples, guaranteeing them the same rights as enjoyed by heterosexual couples.

Colombia Becomes 4th Latin American Country To Legalises Same Sex Marriage

Colombia’s top court has finally legalised same-sex marriage across the country.

Same-sex couples were already allowed to form civil partnerships, but a ruling this week extends them the same marriage rights as heterosexual couples.

colombia-gay-marriage

Earlier this month the constitutional court dismissed a judge’s petition against equal marriage rights for heterosexual and homosexual couples.

This make Colombia the fourth in Latin America to do so. Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay have previously legalised same-sex marriage.

Argentina was the first Latin American country to take the step in July 2010.

In Mexico, gay marriage is legal in the capital and in certain states.

Mexico’s Supreme Court Effectively Legalises Same-Sex Marriage

The Supreme Court in Mexico has legalised same-sex marriage in a landmark legal ruling.

However, the country doesn’t have equal marriage rights just yet.

A court has decreed that it is unconstitutional for Mexican states to bar same-sex marriages.

As the purpose of matrimony is not procreation, there is no justified reason that the matrimonial union be heterosexual, nor that it be stated as between only a man and only a woman. Such a statement turns out to be discriminatory in its mere expression.”

Whilst no official legislation has been brought forward in parliament to introduce marriage for gay and bisexual couples, the court ruling represents a precedent that will require courts throughout the country to follow suit.

This means that same-sex marriage has effectively been legalised throughout Mexico.

Estefanía Vela, a legal scholar at a Mexico City university told the New York Times of the ruling:

Without a doubt, gay marriage is legal everywhere. If a same-sex couple comes along and the code says marriage is between a man and a woman and for the purposes of reproduction, the court says, ‘Ignore it, marriage is for two people’.”

However, same-sex couples might still run into a few snags because local registrars are not required to follow this ruling; however gay couples denied marriage rights in their states are able to seek injunctions from district judges since the jurisprudential thesis now requires the judges to grant them.

Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as just ignoring the discriminatory code or the local registrar. Even though judges are now required to provide marriage licenses, if a registrar denies a same-sex couple, it is up to that couple to appeal the courts.

That process can cost $1,000 or more and the legal process can take months. While this means marriage is not 100% equal, the recent ruling in Mexico is definitely a step in the right direction.

A number of Latin American countries have allowed same-sex marriage in recent years. Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay have already done so, whilst Chile and Ecuador are set to do so in the near future.

Backlash at Brazilian Company O Boticário for Releasing Advert Featuring Same-Sex Couples

Boticário, after they made an advert featuring same-sex couples.

The commercial has made a big impact in Brazil over the last week, causing both negative and positive commentary on social media channels.

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 18.31.31

Some people tried to organise a boycott of O Boticário, as well as other companies advocating for marriage equality.

Outraged viewers even opened up a campaign against O Boticário on ReclaimeAqui.

I do not want my children to watch this propaganda. I have the right to preserve the family institution in my home.”

O Boticário actually responded on ReclaimeAqui, saying it “believes in the beauty of relations” and that the point of the campaign is to ”approach with respect and sensitivity, the various forms of love.”

Season 2 of Brazilian-based Lesbian Web Series ‘RED’ is on it Way (Video)

The Brazilian-based web series RED focuses on two actresses, Mel and Liz, who meet while filming a movie and find that their mutual attraction throws them both for a loop.

In season one, we saw Liz, who has no trouble attracting women, falling for the very married Mel.

Mel, who has always assumed she was happy in her life and marriage, begins to feel a pull towards Liz that she never expected.

s1e2-red-a-cor-vermelha s1e8-red-in-vino-veritas (1)

Created by Viv Schiller and Germana Bolo, the series is beautiful put together and well acted. Lead actresses Ana Paula Lima (Liz) and Luciana Bollina (Mel) are stunning and completely captivating.

The new season starts Friday 29th May. However, you can see the first full season of RED free at KitschMix TV.

Follow RED on Twitter and Instagram for more updates.

Brazil: The Lesbian Kiss that Went Viral. BRILLIANT

A Brazilian man named Nelson Felippe posted an image with an angry rant on Facebook yesterday that went viral almost immediately, earning more than 7,000 Facebook likes.

I’m not prejudiced. I think people should do whatever they want to with their lives. But I think it’s absurd that I should be forced to witness a scene like this…

viral-photo-brazil-01

What people do in private is their business only, but yes, what they do in public concerns me, and I refuse to see a scene like this and consider it normal

viral-photo-brazil-03

They’re challenging social conventions, and that can be dangerous. What if some tragedy strikes, or worse, if someone dies, who’s to blame?

viral-photo-brazil-04

What would happen to a child who sees this scene every day? Kids will think it’s normal to wait for the subway on the yellow line. So, don’t act like that guy over there. Follow the example of the girls.

viral-photo-brazil-02

Love Is Colourful | New Paint Ad From Brazil Shows That Love Comes In All Shapes And Colours

Zim Coloured Powder – which is a non-toxic, non-irritating, non-staining powder is often used at festivals – has created a new LGBT-oriented ad campaign that simply shows that love is something that can grow between people of all shapes, colours and sizes.

Both Gay, lesbian and heterosexual couples are all present in the ad campaign, ensuring that the multi-coloured message extends to the LGBT community as well.

The ad campaign was created in collaboration with Tuppi, a Brazilian advertising agency.

love-is-colorful-01 love-is-colorful-02 love-is-colorful-03

Brazilians Stage Kissing Protest After Bar Kicks Out Lesbian Couple For Embracing In Public

Protesters have taken to the street in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil, with a kissing protest against homophobic treatment of two women.

About 50 Brazilian protesters responded with kisses on Sunday at a bar that had kicked out a presumed lesbian couple for embracing in public. The management of the bar in the town of Ribeirao Preto said in a statement the women, ages 22 and 23, had been shown the door a week ago for “inappropriate behaviour.”

The women immediately filed a complaint with the police and a Brazilian lawyers’ association commission against homophobia.

At Sunday’s protests, youths carried signs denouncing homophobia and engaged in a “beijaco,” or collective kissing, as police looked on.

A bill to punish homophobia has been sidelined for years in the Brazilian Congress by resistance from Catholics and Protestant Evangelicals.

In 2011, however, the Supreme Court guaranteed same-sex couples in stable unions the same rights as heterosexual couples.

Start Watching of New Lesbian Web Series from Brazil ‘RED’

The new Brazilian web series RED is now out – in Portuguese but with english sub-titles (perfect). We highly recommend you all start watching this slick new series that already has our pulses racing – addictive viewing.

RED is based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and tells the story of two actresses, Mel Béart and Liz Malmo, that meet on the set of a short film called RED. The two women soon take their developing romance from the set, as Scarlet and Simone (Mel and Liz, respectively), to real life.

RED will have a total of eight webisodes in its first season, premiering weekly on Vimeo. It’s a lesbian-themed webseries independently produced and financed by its creators, Viv Schiller and Germana Belo, who were inspired by other great content shared within the LGBT community. Coming from a country where sexual diversity is timidly discussed, both writers felt it was time to create awesome content for [the local] people who want to see more stories that focus on same-sex relationships.

Viv and Germana pitched their idea to actor and director Fernando Belo, who decided to embrace the project. The producers started a campaign to raise R$ 7.000 (Brazilian Reais) through crowd funding for season two.

A Polyamorous Marriage – Legal in Brazil

One thing our modern society requires is for us to be is straight, cisgender and monogamous.

However, we are slowly making progress regarding LGB people, and even regarding T people. A big part of LGBT communities has always been polyamory.

What is polyamory? Well it is a Greek word, which means the practice, desire, or acceptance of having more than one intimate relationship at a time, with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. It is distinct from swinging (which emphasizes sex with others as merely recreational) and may or may not include polysexuality (attraction towards multiple genders and/or sexes).

It is our natural tendency to think that we need to be monogamous, because that is what you are taught to think, and what society requires from us for marriage.

However, in Brazil it is not illegal to be married to more than one person, therefore a judge can grant a polyamorous couple their right to marry.

In Tupã, which is in the state of São Paulo, a triad was married, which is a huge step for polyamory. The triads were living together in Rio de Janeiro for 3 years and they admitted to have been sharing their finances throughout this time period. The group consisted of two females and a male. It  was made possible to unite the females due to the legalization of gay marriage back in 2004.

“We are only recognizing what has always existed. We are not inventing anything”, said one of the women in the married triad. Her words are indeed true; polyamory has always been around, it’s just society that tries to tell us otherwise.

In Brazil because it is not illegal, a judge may easily, if they wish so, accept such unions. So in Brazil, in theory, you can also have a lesbian or a gay triad. All variations are possible as long as you find the right judge. Still keep in mind, though the law might be accepting, people may not ne. Many religious groups have since stepped forward, and people against gay marriage have said that this is the downside of civil marriage and gay marriage. In reality, we are just breaking the restrictions people have put upon us due to hatred.

Homophobic Remarks During Political Debate Cause Out-cry in Brazil

A minor character in Brazil’s election faced a firestorm of criticism from activists on Monday after saying during a presidential debate that the country needs to stand up against gay people who should receive psychological help far away from the general population.

The comments by presidential candidate Levy Fidelix, who has the support of less than 1 percent of potential voters, drew no reaction from the leading candidates during the nationally televised debate late Sunday. But online and on social media tens of thousands of people denounced Fidelix as homophobic and hateful.

Gay rights activists urged people to file complaints against Fidelix and asked that TV stations remove him from the final presidential debate on Thursday.

Fidelix, a former journalist who founded the center-right Brazilian Labor Renewal Party, gets equal airtime in presidential debates as President Dilma Rousseff, her main opponent Marina Silva and four other presidential hopefuls.

During the debate, candidate Luciana Genro asked Fidelix why some politicians refused to accept same-sex couples as families.

He responded with…

“Those people who have those problems should receive psychological help. And very far away from us, because here it is not acceptable.”

Levy Fidelix

Some members of the audience laughed at the remarks, but social media exploded with comments accusing him of homophobia.

Congressman Jean Wyllys, known for defending rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, said on Monday that he is seeking legal advice to see whether the candidate can be sued for incitement to violence against gays.

Wyllys called Fidelix’s comments during the debate hate speech. It was “motivated by a nauseating mix of stupidity, homophobia and vulgar demagoguery,” he wrote on his Facebook page.

On Twitter and Facebook, people said “Levy, you are disgusting,” and tens of thousands were furious at his comments. Many said it was a perfect reason to approve a law that would punish discrimination against the LGBT.

Advocates have been calling for a law that would ban discrimination against the LGBT community, saying it would reduce violence against its members.

Silva has already faced complaints by gay rights activists. In August, she retracted proposals to change the constitution to allow gay marriage and to support a law that would criminalize sex-based discrimination.

A day after launching her government plan in which the proposals were revealed, Silva said there was a mistake in the publication process and clarified that she believed the same-sex unions allowed in Brazil already ensure all rights to same-sex couples.

Watch the Teaser for New Brazilian Lesbian Webs Series ‘RED’

RED is the a new web series from Brazil. An 8 episode show, that has been pitched as a cross between a noir film of the 50s, with a modern L Word twist.

http://youtu.be/BZdNy243LmA

The web series tells the story of Mel Béart and Liz Malmo, two actresses who meet while shooting a short film and end up taking their on-screen relation off-scree.

However, the show is not just a visual experience. What is interesting about this web series, is the creators plan to use social media channels to also tell the stories.

“RED also comes up with the proposal to bring its audience a broader way of experiencing the story you want to tell, through a narrative that, in this case, is not restricted to audiovisual and generates content on different platforms, such as social networks like Twitter and Instagram. This means that the viewer knows the story not only through watching, but also information that has access through these different means. Far from being new, is the fact that, today, still offers little in that direction when we consider what is produced nationally… “

RED Production Team

The series will be launched on the Internet in late September.

The LGBT visibility has increasingly been the subject of discussions, and film to large networks of foreign television industry, we see a growing investment stories with this theme. However, when it comes to the national media, this movement is still shy. Gradually television is opening space for these characters and stories, but we’re still taking its first steps in this direction. Projects like ours are very important to show the mainstream media that there is rather a large LGBT audience that wants to see represented in a realistic way, with respect and without lapse into caricature or traditionalist censorship. Enabling the first and second seasons of RED, we hope to contribute to the advancement of this discussion and to open more space for the LGBT audience in novels, TV series, movies, and others.

We hope this is the first of several projects developed by RED team. The success of our first few seasons will be opening doors to develop new series and movies, always addressing issues that we consider important to the society we live in, counted in order to enhance the experience of our viewer.

RED Production Team

Boys Wear Skirts to School in Protest After Trans Classmate Is Fined for Doing the Same – #VouDeSaia

Being a young person in school can be difficult at the best of times. There’s the pressure of having high grades, trying to maintain a personal life during exam season and then there’s the realization that adulthood (and the responsibility that goes with it) is soon approaching. Stressful stuff. But, for transgender student Maria Muniz, things got so much more so when her school, Colégio Pedro II in Brazil, decided to fine her for wearing a skirt to school.

However, thanks to some ingenious thinking by her classmates, Colégio Pedro II may be backtracking. The decision to fine Muniz was made due to the school’s harsh dress code. While the original fine was certainly unfortunate, her classmates took it upon themselves to protest the ruling the only way they felt fit…by wearing skirts to school themselves.

Both boys and girls at the school decided to show up in skirts which caused officials to change their minds. Speaking to Brazilian publication Globo, they say that they are considering relaxing the dress code.

Not only that, but following the protest the school posted an image of the students in their skirts to Twitter which became popular on the site and saw users tweet using the hashtag #VouDeSaia in support, which translates as ‘I’ll Get By’.

Muniz also adds that “for me, wearing a skirt was about expressing my freedom over who I am inside and not how society sees me, I am really happy about the way my classmates supported me and hope it serves as an example to others to feel encouraged to do the right thing. I was always taught at school to accept who you are. I am only trying to live that.” So even if the dress code hasn’t been fully repealed (yet), Muniz’ fine has at least been overturned so it sounds like their protest paid off.

Being Trans in Brazil: Prejudice and Murder

Summer brought a glitter ball of worldwide Pride events, and in Brazil they held the biggest Pride going. However looking past the partying, we sometimes forget about the day-to-day bravery of transgender people, and the discrimination they face.

Our world has yet to take those accepting steps towards equality, and finally turn its back on discrimination. In ‘accepting’ LGBT countries, the murder of trans women is still rising, and in Brazil abuse is a daily occurrence.

In Brazil there is no word for transgender people – it is just ‘transvestite’, which is also the word used to discriminate against trans women.

Although Brazil has laws in place to protect the trans community, in practice people say and do otherwise. Trans women are freely ridiculed in the media, and in TV ‘novellas’, the nations favorite viewing, they are stereotyped as a comedy fool or street prostitute.

This prejudice doesn’t stop there, it runs deep. Families often see trans family members as a disgrace, leaving them without support and homes. The educational system and foster homes discriminate as well.

According to Grupo Gay da Bahia, every two days a LGBT person is brutally murdered in Brazil. According to the statistics only 2% of these attackes were aimed at lesbians. Most of them are on trans people.

The problem is that people do not report such crimes. In general Brazil’s police is rather weak in the face of the large scale of crimes and corruption, as well as their own prejudices. In fact, a large amount of hate crimes in Brazil are initiated by the police. This often prevents people from reporting them at all.

The largest crime committed is rape of lesbian women. If the woman comes forward the crime will never be seen as homophobia, but solely as rape by definition.

The truth is, Brazil is far less accepting than people think. The law may seem friendly, but people continue to discriminate and commit hate crimes again the LGBT community.

Going Forward With Acceptance The Brazilian Way

In Brazil, soap operas are hugely popular and it is a very interesting to see the entire population drop everything to watch them, whether they like it or not. Televisions are even put in buses to make sure that no one misses an episode. There are usually three or more running soap operas on the country’s main channel, Globo, and the most watched is the prime time show at 9 PM. The prime time soap is usually regarded as the best.

Em Familia, the current prime time soap, has already sparked controversy in Brazil and beyond. The main couple is involved with a theme of family incest. The uncle of the main character is pursuing her, claiming she resembles her mother (with whom he had an affair many years ago). Said uncle, Laerte, isn’t very well liked by viewers. Recently in Brasilia there was a protest in the main mall to take Laerte down! That’s how much the people care about the soap opera.

However Em Familia really caught the attention of many abroad due to the fact that one of the characters is having a lesbian relationship. This is a very big thing when it comes to Brazil, which doesn’t often portray gay relationships, particularly lesbian couples. The first gay kiss ever aired was between two men (of course it was rather brief as well).

The lesbian couple on Em Familia has sparked controversy among everyone, but it is a very important and positive step for Brazil. The characters Marina and Clara have gained many international fans and there have even been outcries to keep the couple together whenever anyone tries to break them up!

The show recently had a moment when these characters had to face homophobia and show how wrong it is, by highlighting how ridiculous it was for another character to say that queer women were not welcome in a bar.

The creator of the novella, Manuel Carlos, confirmed that the season finale which will be airing in a few weeks will feature the wedding of Clara and Marina! This will truly be a first for a lesbian couple to be married and also to kiss on prime time. We at KM are very excited to follow this story. Thankfully for those who do not speak Portuguese there are many versions available online for you to follow these two glamorous Brazilian women in love!

Peru’s Rights Plan Excludes All Sexual Minorities

Peru has made slow progress in the field of gay rights, and has lagged behind its neighbors in bringing recognition and equality to sexual minorities. Its bordering states Ecuador, Brazil, and Colombia all recognize gay unions or marriage equality. With Chile and Bolivia, all have policies protecting LGBT people from discrimination in the provision of services, and all include queers in hate-crime legislation. Of that group, Brazil alone doesn’t protect against LGBT employment discrimination, yet Peru has had none of these progresses.

Peru remains an island where marriage, civil unions, discrimination protection, and hate-crime protection are reserved for heterosexuals.

The Peruvian debate has been characterized by a brinkmanship between a government unable to reach consensus enough to explicitly include sexual minorities in legislation, and activist groups who see claims that protection can be extended without it as insufficient if not outright insincere.

Early this month the Peruvian federal government led by President Ollanta Humala passed National Human Rights Action Plan of 2014-2016. Complaints quickly arose that LGBT people and groups were excluded from the Plan’s protection. Last week the Minister of Justice, Daniel Figallo, responded to those complaints insisting that LGBT people are included as he called on groups and populations to work against discrimination individually as well.

“No one has been excluded. The country’s main problem is discrimination; there is widespread discrimination at various levels, and we are working against it. Those positions indicating an exclusion are incorrect.”

Daniel Figallo, Minister of Justice

Still, despite his insistence that the Plan implicitly includes sexual minorities, the Plan fails to mention them in any direct way.
Unsurprisingly, rights groups have been unsatisfied with this response. They see this as another in a long line of failures on behalf of the Humala administration to extend the protections of the state to all groups.

In 2013 a hate-crime bill that would have extended protections to queer communities was rejected by a majority coalition of the Gana Peru and Fuerza Popular parties. The same parties blocked a consensus on a following civil-unions law, and the debate was postponed and never revived.

In June of this year the Organization of American States (OAS) passed a resolution regarding “Human Rights, Sexual Orientation, and Gender Identity and Expression” that included language agreeing to support anti-discrimination legislation and hate-crime recognition, and to avoid interfering in the private lives of LGBT individuals. While Peru signed the resolution, action has yet to be taken toward anti-discrimination and hate-crime laws for LGBT people.

During the debate on the Human Rights Plan 2014-2016, eighteen proposals regarding the LGBT community were rejected or edited before all were ultimately removed.

UN Launches Campaign on Equality and Rights of LGBTs in Brazil

Brazil Pride 01On Monday the 28th April, 2014, the United Nations launched a campaign on equality and rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transsexuals and transvestites (LGBT) in Brazil. In partnership with São Paulo City Hall, the campaign “Livres & Iguais” (Free & Equal), was initiated to shine a light on the alarming rates of violence against lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transvestites and transsexuals. It is the UN’s aim to promote equality and respect for human rights of the LGBT groups.

At the launch was São Paulo City Mayer, Fernando Haddad, Daniela Mercury, UN Champion of Equality, the Assistant Director of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Humberto Henderson, and the Director of the United Nations Information Centre in Brazil (UNIC Rio), Giancarlo Summa

LGBT Community was represented by Keila Simpson, President of the Transvestites of Bahia Association (ATRAS) and winner of the Human Rights Award 2013 in the LGBT category;

Alessandro Melchior, Municipal Coordinator of  LGBT Policies; Fernando Quaresma de Azevedo, President of the São Paulo LGBT Parade Association (APOGLBT); Gustavo Bernardes, President of the LGBT National Council; Thaís Faria, Officer at ILO; and Leandro Ramos, Representative of  AllOut, the international organization that develops mobilization campaigns in defence of LGBT rights. Leandro Ramos will also act as moderation of the event.

The event is part of a list of activities in the run up to LGBT Pride Month in São Paulo. São Paulo LGBT Pride Parade (Parada do Orgulho LGBT de São Paulo) takes place in Avenida Paulista, and has been running since 1997. It is one of the biggest pride parades and the city’s government not only invests millions to support the parade, but many politicians show up to open the main event and ride on floats.

São Paulo LGBT Pride Parade Pride receives about 400,000 tourists and makes between R$ 180 million and R$ 190 million.

Brazil Pride 04