Tag Archives: Dead Lesbian Syndrome

Watch The New Lesbian Web Series ‘Different For Girls’ Here For Free (And Be Prepared To Get Hooked)

Different For Girls is a really sexy and dramatic web series by Campbell X and based on a hit indie lesbian novel by Jacquie Lawrence.

Set in west London, it’s the perfect soap, with characters you love to love, and characters you love to hate.

There’s Gemma, who’s dating Jude, but who’s also getting married to a guy – to satisfy her parents and his acting career.

Jude though hasn’t really cut ties with her ex, Nicola, which isn’t making things easier with Gemma. Nicola is supposed to have moved on and has a wife, Brooke, and kids. Even so, Nicola has a hard time committing to this supposed domestic bliss, and if having an affair on the side. Brooke may not know that, but she does know her partner is neglecting her home life.

Then there Fran and Cam – and where do we start with them? The two women have just got back together, but Cam’s discovered she’s pregnant. And who’s the father? Fran’s twin brother, Tom! Perhaps not too surprisingly, Fran isn’t too impressed with this development.

The five episodes represent what was originally going to be the first half of Season 1, so the whole thing does end on a cliffhanger. However, it will certainly leave you wanting to know what happens with Fran, Cam and the baby; what’s going with the philandering Nicola; and whether Gemma and Tom’s sham marriage is really a good idea.

Hopefully we will get to find out fairly soon, as currently they’re hoping to shoot Season 2 in September.

Watch all 5 episodes below.

 

‘Different For Girls’ – The New WebSeries Where No Lesbians Are Killed

Different For Girls is coming soon and they’ve just dropped this steamy new trailer.

Starring a host of talented actresses – Rachel Shelley (The L Word), Sophie Ward (Land Girls, Doctors), Heather Peace (Lip Service), Janet Ellis (Doctor Who), Amy Lamé (RuPaul’s Drag Race, Loose Women), Guinevere Turner (The L Word and Go Fish), Nimmy March (Wallander, Thin Ice) among others – the web series is about the lives and betrayals of a group of queer women living in London.

The series creator, BAFTA award-winning producer Jacqui Lawrence, discussed the importance of the show to our community,

Television has been found guilty of murder in the first degree. But it’s never been charged. The victims have one thing in common. They are all lesbians. Television is literally getting away with murder. Different For Girls is here to save the fate of fictional lesbians. Different For Girls is a web drama series but you can rest assured that no lesbian will be killed or harmed during it’s making. Not unless one of them dies from too much love, lust and laughter.”

Different For Girls is an adaptation of Lawrence’s fiction novel of the same name –  first published as an e-book in 2014, and then as a paperback in 2015.

It’s easy to be glib about this but in reality the constant ‘disposal’ of lesbian characters has an acute impact on younger viewers who are struggling with their sexuality…

We are desperate to see lesbian and bi characters that manage to live their dramatic and complicated lives, on screen, without fear of death by car, helicopter crash, house fire or stray bullet. Different For Girls is here to save the fate of lesbians and bisexual from what has become known as the Dead Lesbian Syndrome.”

Creator Of ‘Last Tango in Halifax’ Says She Made A Mistake By Killing Off Lesbian Character

It was a sad day when BBC drama Last Tango In Halifax  killed off heavily pregnant Kate (Nina Sosanya) in a car crash last year, just after finally marrying partner Caroline.

At the time, the show’s writer Sally Wainwright said that it was a ‘myth’ that lesbians always get killed off and that “people get killed off all the time”.

Wainwright also explained that it was a “narrative” decision, which caused further backlash from the show’s fans as they didn’t feel like Kate’s death added anything to the plot.

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Many criticised the trend of killing off lesbians on TV – known mockingly as ‘Dead Lesbian Syndrome’ – the running joke in the queer female community is that if there’s a lesbian in a show, you can almost guarantee that she’ll be offed by the end of the season.

Wainwright said:

It was a shock. I didn’t realise how attached the audience had become to that relationship and to those two characters.

Of the criticism, she said: “I found it hard and I regretted it. I do think I made a mistake. I wished I had found a better story.”

Davies said:

It might be one of my least favourite things that you ever wrote, partly because it was off-stage… I think you were trying to make the point that death is random and off-stage, but it had the effect of it being an off-stage death.

It’s really unfortunate that you walked slightly into the world of those lesbian deaths, that extraordinary numbers of lesbian characters end up being killed off.

What people miss is that Caroline is alive and the heart of the drama and she’s a lesbian as well, but it’s tough getting criticism.”

He added:

You know, I could have told you that you were going to have that flack! [When I found out] you were doing that story… I gasped! Because I know the gays quite well, I thought ‘oh my god that’s going to be trouble!’

I’m kicking myself [for not warning you].”

Wainwright added:

I was on the cusp and wasn’t sure if it was the right thing to do. You worry afterwards if you could have worked harder or if it was a lazy choice because those were the criticisms.”

The fourth season of the show is expected to air later this year, so look out for more Last Tango In Halifax then.

Daily Juice: Why TV’s “Dead Lesbian Syndrome” Needs To Stop

It’s a bad time to be a queer woman on TV. Actually, looking at the statistics, it’s never been a good time to be a queer female character on television.

BuzzFeed has released a parody PSA for a TV trope you may not have put a name to, but have probably noticed — “Dead Lesbian Syndrome.”

Sharon Osbourne opens up about sexuality after stories claim she’s bisexual. While speaking with Gay Star News, the 63-year-old said the discussions didn’t bother her. 

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“No, not at all, it didn’t bother me. It’s just people didn’t really listen to the discussion, which doesn’t surprise me. But it didn’t bother me being labeled that. I do truly feel that everybody at some time in their lives wonders – not that they [necessarily] act on it – what it would be like to have a sexual relationship with somebody of the same sex. I just do. I think people who say they don’t are lying.”

Despite Cara Delevinge and Rihanna skipping the Met Gala, yesterday there was still plenty of celebs to excite. Cue J.Crew president Jenna Lyons, Jenni Konner and Lena Dunham kicking ass with their dapper style.

Jane Fonda has a message LGBT Youth. In an interview with The Advocate at the season 2 premiere of Grace and Frankie, she said.

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Just know that you are not alone, that all around this country, there are places that you can go to find support and help and advice and love. You are not alone,”

Jillian Michaels and Heidi Rhoades talk about their family with Huffington Post. A quote from Jillian:

There are those who can seriously ask how you couldn’t love a small human brought into your home? I can’t even comprehend that kind of thinking. Neither one of my kids are biologically mine. Our son is biologically Heidi’s child, but what does that matter? I just don’t understand that line of reasoning. You didn’t give birth to your husband or your wife, and you love them.”

Woman has job offer withdrawn after bosses find her racy lesbian ‘art’ photo on Instagram.

Noreen Sweeney is suing the Paterson Board of Education in New Jersey for allegedly discriminating against her for being “a white lesbian.”

The organizers of the Milwaukee Pride Parade have fired this year’s lesbian Grand Marshall, Miriam Ben-Shalom, because she is critical of “trans-women” .

Brazilian filmmaker Vera Egito talks to After Ellen about her lesbian storyline in “Restless Love”

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new same-sex marriage bill has been introduced in Australia.

And a Californian school bans lesbian prom queens because it’s ‘not fair to the boy gender’.

15 Times Tumblr Nailed Televisions Rampant Killing Of Lesbians

Three prominent lesbian characters have been killed on three beloved TV shows over the past month, and we’re upset.

So are these Tumblr fans, but they have some some seriously creative ways to respond.

Take notes, class is in session:

1. Be prepared

http://mindyquinzel.tumblr.com/post/141414422012

2. Save them now

https://maggiegrheene.tumblr.com/post/141419665267

3. Reality sucks

https://knockfivetimes.tumblr.com/post/141003996956/straight-person-i-like-to-watch-tv-shows-to-get

4. Shhhh, she’s not really gay

https://aerials-creampuff.tumblr.com/post/140914872743

5. Straight vs. gay

https://debnamdaddy.tumblr.com/post/141405946173/straight-character-gets-hit-by-car-falls-of-a

6. Top tips

http://pasteljongins.tumblr.com/post/141404780192/how-to-survive-as-a-television-character

7. Plot twist

https://aerials-creampuff.tumblr.com/post/140890051518

8. We’d be rich too

http://fearthelesbians.tumblr.com/post/141405689610

9. Predictable

http://pasteljongins.tumblr.com/post/141404970807

10. New anthem

https://alyciaswink.tumblr.com/post/141407945558/another-one-bites-the-dust

11. Will they ever listen

http://netflixdesign.tumblr.com/post/141404742676

12. Men’s man pain

https://ankleboner.tumblr.com/post/141414276411/another-unworthy-lesbian-woman-dying-for-mens-man

13. Writers block

http://daddygriffin.tumblr.com/post/141452185993

14. Queerbiat

https://ithelpstodream.tumblr.com/post/141446673452

15. Walk away from the shows

https://hellurrritsme.tumblr.com/post/141448969239/opens-tumblr-dot-com-sees-that-jroth-is-being-a

The good news is that there are still several lesbian, bi, or fluid female characters on TV: Annalise on How to Get Away with Murder, Tara on The Walking Dead, and Nora and Mary Louise on The Vampire Diaries, to name a few.

TV Shows Are Still Killing Lesbians Off

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Merely weeks ago on the CW sci-fi drama The 100, Lexa (played by Fear the Walking Dead star Alycia Debnam-Carey) died shortly after consummating her relationship with series lead Clarke (Eliza Taylor).

This event sparked massive outcry from the The 100 fandom who accused the show’s writers of falling back in a well-established trope known as “Dead Lesbian Syndrome.”

Now TV land is at it again, and sadly in the latest episode of  The Walking Dead has killed off one of their two lesbian characters, Alexandria’s doctor Denise (played by Merritt Wever), who died from a nasty arrow through the eye (mid-sentence, no less) fired by returning villain Dwight (Austin Amelio).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0w_BVCdsfeU

Sadly, this is third lesbian character to die across three different TV shows – The 100 and Jane the Virgin being the other shows – in as many months.

Fans expressed their frustration via social.

https://twitter.com/NELSONNMURDOCK/status/712035161165209601

https://twitter.com/shaunagrv/status/712015446241910784

http://clarkes-murphy.tumblr.com/post/141393957896

Wever herself addressed potential backlash telling The Daily Beast:

I understand if viewers watching the show really identify with the character or like seeing themselves or some part of the world that they know is real and true and valid and prevalent represented.

And then to have that taken away, I definitely see how that would be disappointing in the broader scheme of things. I’m not sure that that’s what was going on here but I understand the sentiment very well and I am familiar with the [trope of] black characters or gay characters getting killed off because [they’re considered] less human or less real or less important and people aren’t gonna care as much. From my end, it didn’t feel like that’s what was happening though. But I certainly understand the concern in the wider culture.

But adding fuel to the fire is how the death scene plays out exactly as it does in the show’s graphic novel counterpart – the difference being the comic kills off male character Abraham (played in the series by Michael Cudlitz), not Denise.

It’s also being argued that this trope – also known as “Dead Lesbian Syndrome” – is heightened by the way in which Carl Grimes (Chandler Riggs) managed to survive a bullet to the eye in episode nine while the arrow to Denise’s eye kills her instantly.

Denise’s death now leaves her partner, Tara as the show’s sole surviving lesbian.

The show features a gay couple, Aaron (Ross Marquand) and Eric (Jordan Woods-Robinson) and while they still remain alive in the series, their relationship has never really factored into the overarching plot.

So there we have it another show, another dead Lesbian.

 

 

‘Last Tango In Halifax’ Writer Regrets Killing Off Lesbian Character

One of the most common tropes when it comes to television is ‘Dead Lesbian Syndrome’. Dead Lesbian Syndrome is what happens a show decides to kill off one of its lesbian characters – the running joke in the queer female community is that if there’s a lesbian in a show, you can almost guarantee that she’ll be offed by the end of the season.

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That’s why it was so sad when BBC drama Last Tango In Halifax was yet another show that decided to kill off a lesbian. Kate was killed in a road accident, not long after her and her wife had gotten married and at the time, the show’s writer Sally Wainwright said that it was a ‘myth’ that lesbians always get killed off and that “people get killed off all the time”. Wainwright also explained that it was a “narrative” decision, which caused further backlash from the show’s fans as they didn’t feel like Kate’s death added anything to the plot.

However, speaking at the Hay Festival in Wales, Wainwright seemed to do a 180 on her previous comments, clarifying that she actually regrets killing off the character.

Also read: It’s a Myth That Lesbians Always Get Killed Off, Says ‘Last Tango in Halifax’ Writer

 

The Last Tango In Halifax writer told DIVA Magazine that

I was very sad to do [kill off Kate]. I wrote another ending but it didn’t work. At the time, I thought it was the right choice, but I do actually regret it now.”

Wainwright also spoke of the difficulty she had in getting Last Tango In Halifax on TV screens. At first, both the BBC and ITV turned down the show based on the pilot episode and it wasn’t until the BBC realised that the show could appeal to those over the age of 50 that they agreed to take it on.

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The older audience of the show is something that Sarah Lancashire, who plays Caroline in the show, also spoke about, saying that their portrayal of lesbian characters has helped women come out:

I’ve never had a response quite like it to be honest. I still get letters now from people in this country and in America who are women who have come out later on in life and have very complicated and tragic stories in a sense. I didn’t realise when I started to play Caroline that she would have this extraordinary impact. It is a strange thing. There are very few pieces I’ve done in my working life that I could say I’m proud of, but Caroline is certainly the one I’m most proud of. Sally… did absolutely brilliantly to demonstrate same-sex relationships between women by normalising it, without sensationalising it or making it titilating. For me, it was the first time I’d ever seen that done on British television.”

The fourth season of the show is expected to air later this year, so look out for more Last Tango In Halifax then.

 

 

Season Four of ‘Last Tango in Halifax’ Confirmed

Sally Wainwright’s BBC1 drama Last Tango in Halifax has been renewed for a fourth series on BBC One. The channel confirmed that the Sarah Lancashire drama will return for another run next year at the end of last night’s (February 1) finale.

The popular romantic drama attracted over 6.5 million viewers for its third series finale on Sunday. While details are scarce, it is expected the fourth series will follow the previous model and air some time towards the end of 2015

Derek Jacobi, Anne Reid and Nicola Walker also star in the series, which is centred around a pair of childhood sweethearts who rediscover love in their later years.

It also features a fantastic yet controversial lesbian storyline, with Sarah Lancashire playing a women coming to terms with late-in-life lesbian relationship and her sexuality.

Lancashire plays Caroline, who she falls for a fellow school teacher named Kate. Throughout season 1, 2 and 3 we have followed their love affair until its tragic ending – booooo!

So here is hoping season 4 will bring the lesbian spark back to the show.

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Wainwright, last year confirmed the US rights to the series were purchased by actress Diane Keaton for a potential remake on HBO.

It’s a Myth That Lesbians Always Get Killed Off, Says ‘Last Tango in Halifax’ Writer

Ask a group of queer, pop culture conscious women and they will tell you that the biggest trope to affect lesbians (after the ‘lesbians sleeps with a man’ trope) is that TV lesbians always seem to get killed off. It’s so regularly witnessed in the media that TV Tropes has dedicated an entire page to it, having dubbed it ‘Dead Lesbian Syndrome’. TV Tropes also notes that LGBTQ people are at a higher risk of suicide. However, many of the cases of dead lesbians that we see on television aren’t because the characters took their own lives and instead are down to common killers such as [SPOILER] Naomi Campbell in Skins who died of cancer.

Dead Lesbian Syndrome is one of the reasons why queer women instruct each other not to get suckered into a show based on its lesbian characters because they will most likely be bumped off in the name of a ‘hard-hitting emotional storyline’ or just because the show’s creator wants to further someone else’s character progression. It’s incredibly unfortunate that that needs to be said but given how often it occurs (American Horror Story, Pretty Little Liars and The L Word have all taken part in the trope) it probably makes sense.

The latest show to join the Dead Lesbian Syndrome Squad is Last Tango in Halifax. In an episode that aired just a few weeks ago, the show dramatically killed off pregnant lesbian Kate not long after she’d married her partner Caroline. Unaware of the trope but now suffering the backlash is Last Tango in Halifax writer Sally Wainwright who has now said the following to DIVA Magazine:

“I think that’s a myth! People get killed off all the time. I got an email from Russell T Davis the day after saying, “I once killed off a gay character and everyone was really upset.” I got an email from another friend saying, “Oh Sally, what have you done? There are few enough lesbians as it is!” I don’t think it’s…I don’t think people think, “I’ve got a lesbian character, I better kill her off.”

It was a really big decision and it was a decision that…I’m still not entirely sure I made the right decision over but… [pauses]. I implore people to see what happens next and see why we did make that decision. When you see what happens next, I think we did make the right decision. It becomes increasingly emotional, the performances with the people left behind become increasingly magnetic and extraordinary, actually.”

Sally Wainwright

Wainwright also confirmed that it was for storyline purposes, “It was a narrative decision, it was a storyline decision”, which perhaps adds further insult to injury.

One problem that queer women have with the Dead Lesbian Trope is that it’s a case of ‘why us?’ Every TV viewer accepts that death is an inevitable storyline that’s going to crop up because that’s life, that’s what happens and that’s what TV shows are attempting to portray (albeit in an overly dramatized way) but it’s unfortunate that the victim of those deaths more often than not is a queer woman.

Many would also argue that using the Dead Lesbian Trope is ineffective because it’s just that – a trope. Tropes are eye-rolling, seen it all before things; they lose their emotional gravitas when you’ve used them over and over again. It’s like a fairy tale that always ends in ‘and then they lived happily ever after’ except we aren’t children anymore, there are no happily ever afters for TV lesbians and the fact that they keep getting killed off hurts LGBT representation.